Joint Media Release: It’s time for Queensland renters to be given a fair go

Today the Minister for Housing, Leeanne Enoch introduced proposed legislation that would see tenants at the whim of the well-funded real estate lobby.

The Make Renting Fair Queensland campaign, supported by over 50 community organisations, have come out today outlining their disappointment with the mixed bag of changes, after two and a half years of waiting, the government’s new proposed legislation.

Penny Carr, CEO of Tenants Queensland, the state’s tenant advisory specialists, supported the government’s move to make rentals more pet friendly and introduce minimum standards, but expressed strong concern for the lack of protections for battling renters from unfair evictions.

“Our staff received over 14,000 calls in March this year. This just shows how many Queensland renters, and their families are in housing distress and are facing crisis point.
Ms Carr is concerned the proposal have been watered down to the point they undermine the current tenancy laws, by introducing more grounds to end tenancies when the tenant is not in breach.

“We advocated new grounds to end tenancies, but only with the view to removing the ability to end tenancies without grounds. The government have done the former but not the latter.

Make Renting Fair is concerned the proposed legislation was watered down following a scare campaign run by the well-funded real estate lobby.

The ability to undertake minor modifications have been removed from the proposals completely. Paige Armstrong, CEO of Queenslanders with Disability Network worries that people with disability will be impacted by this.

“Minor modifications like the addition of a shower or other rails make places safer for tenants with little impact upon the appearance and structural integrity of a property.

“What we hear from our members is that they are often reluctant to contact their real estate in fear of a backlash like ending their tenancy or not renewing their lease,” Ms Armstrong commented.

People experiencing domestic and family violence and older women are among the people reliant on private rental homes. Fiona Caniglia, Director of Q Shelter said the proposals include very important protections for people experiencing domestic violence. However, without protection from unfair evictions, many people will continue to live in properties in poor repair and be forced to move frequently. This causes poverty and people experience significant instability.

“We know that older women are one of the fastest growing groups of people facing homelessness across our state. These are women who have worked their entire lives, raised families, paid taxes and they are left with virtually nothing and sometimes, not even with a place to call home,” Ms Caniglia said.

Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) CEO Aimee McVeigh said that the government demonstrated that they recognise their responsibility to act on housing insecurity in the state budget this week, but the 1.8 million Queenslanders who rent can’t be forgotten.

“The most important factor of the government’s prior commitment to rental reform was protecting tenants from unfair evictions. This bill does nothing to improve the status quo.

“It defies belief that minimum standards for air and ventilation have been dropped from the reforms. If a person or company can afford to invest in property, they can afford to ensure a tenant has enough light and air.

“We need reform that ensures that all Queenslanders have access to safe, secure and certain housing, whether that be social housing or privately renting.”

ENDS.

Background
Make Renting Fair in Qld is an alliance of organisations which support progressive reform of our renting laws so that all Queenslanders can make the place they live in their home, whether they rent or own.

Media contact:

Penny Carr, Tenants Queensland  – 0418747921

Chantelle Tibbotts, Tenants Queensland – 0421 234 989

Paige Armstrong, Queenslanders with Disability Network  – 0408 720 099